Chair Design Series, Part 1

This is the first of an undetermined number of posts in a chair design series. My goal is to make a completely 3D printed, functional chair based on Enzo Mari’s chair from his book, Enzo Mari – autoprogettazione? My plan is to spend a fair amount of time designing the chair before I begin printing. I will be exploring ways to minimize elements while optimizing a design suitable for printing in a 600 cubic millimeter space. Instructional videos will be included. At the end, I should have a well-designed 3D printed chair and anyone participating should have one as well.

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3DBenchy & Me

I have seen photographs of Benchys for years and I did not understand why so many people printed one. It was not until I found a benchmark tool created by Kickstarter and Autodesk last month that I bothered to find an answer. I did not realize that it is an actual bench-marking tool. After owning a 3D printer for four years, I downloaded a zip file from Thingiverse and printed my first Benchy.

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Fascinating Finials

I designed this finial and hook for my bedroom windows and along the way I fell in love with the color magenta. Somehow, during my life, I missed the fact that this color is between red and blue. I always thought of it as a pink and it isn’t. Pink is a whitened red. This fuchsine, fuchsia, or magenta has a cooling quality. I experienced it first hand as I had printed a finial in red initially and placed in on the rod. The red was too much of a bright but uninteresting color in that position. I felt the mix was perfect when I changed to magenta. It was colorful enough to demand attention, but did so in a relaxing way.

Models were made in Blender and Tinkercad. All parts were printed on a Creality 10s mini printer with colorFabb’s PLA/PHA magenta filament.

Digital Craftsperson

Creality CR-10 Mini printing part of a table top

“…we’re getting to a point where people understand that 3D printing doesn’t exist for the sake of 3D printing. It’s a tool that unleashes creativity. It’s an instrument that enables all of us to become digital craftsmen.”

Avi Reichental (cited by Davies, Leaders of the New School…, March 29, 2019: TCT MAG)

3D printing has really branched out in the past few years. One of the branches, Desktop Additive Manufacturing (AM), has symbolically climbed only one rung of a ladder to the heights it is capable of reaching. Not everything can be made by 3D printing; yet, a lot of what is used in a home, for example, can be made there and customized to fit the aesthetics of the person doing the printing.

Home products are the main focus of my 3D printing efforts, as I do not have space for an adequate wood workshop, but I do have space for a desktop printer. My prints are all made with filaments that are non-toxic after printing. I have an enclosure for my printer and a nano air purifier to handle ultrafine particles emitted by the printer’s hot end. The printer and its accessories integrate suitably into my living space.

My main goals for this blog are to share my work; inspire others to design and print home products; promote Desktop AM as a means to improving life quality; and disseminate information important to Digital Craftspeople. I look forward to having meaningful interactions with others interested in Desktop AM.